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IPS Launches State Earn and Learn (SEAL) in partnership with IKORCC, Pepper Construction

Indianapolis Public Schools (IPS) is launching a State Earn and Learn (SEAL) partnership that will allow students to get a head start on their careers in carpentry.
During a media briefing today at Arsenal Technical High School, IPS officials announced a partnership with Indianapolis-based Pepper Construction and Indiana Kentucky Ohio Regional Council of Carpenters (IKORCC).
Through the partnership, IPS will offer opportunities for students to seamlessly transition to IKORCC’s US DOL Registered Apprenticeship program directly after high school graduation. Students enrolled in the Construction Trades pathway at Arsenal Tech will be able to earn up to 14 college credits towards the apprenticeship requirements as well as earn their Carpentry Level I Apprenticeship Certification.
Students also will have the opportunity, through Pepper Construction, to gain on-the-job work experience through summer enrichment programming and a senior year capstone.
“The SEAL certification and partnerships with IKORCC and Pepper Construction will be value-added for our students and provide them with an immediate entry point into post-secondary training and employment directly after high school,” said Jenny Berry, CTE pathway director for IPS.“IKORCC is very pleased to connect SEAL program students with our signatory contractors and form partnerships to promote work-based learning opportunities,” said Chris Charters, IKORCC outreach specialist, who noted that the SEAL programs will provide the students with a chance to develop job-related skills and build relationships that will help them to establish a career as a carpenter upon high school graduation.
Indiana’s SEAL programs are certified through the Office of Career and Technical Education. They are structured, but flexible, programs that include an education component and on-the-job component.
SEAL programs focus on employer needs, with sustainable partnerships and embedded industry certifications. These can last from weeks to years depending on the employer, education, certification, or licensing requirements. SEAL initiatives also may be developed as youth or adult programs with K-12 or post-secondary partners.
“The IKORCC construction SEAL program has created a door of opportunity for the next generation of leaders.” Anthony White, project manager, Pepper Construction, said. “Pepper Construction feels a responsibility to empower the next generation through mentorship so they can develop the skills needed to propel our industry forward. Together we can make a difference to create a better future for us to thrive.”
The Indiana Department of Workforce Development projects Indiana employers will need to fill more than one million additional jobs in the next 10 years, half of which will not require a four-year college degree, but some type of certification or credential beyond a high school diploma.

Check out the IPS partnership with IKORCC and Pepper Construction! Link HERE

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INTMA Contest

On February 26, seven Lowell High School students boarded a bus at 4:00 am to head to Indy to compete in the INTMA (Indiana National Tooling & Machining Association) held at the IVY Tech Campus in Indianapolis, IN.  Lowell High school has never competed in any of the 18 yearly contests the INTMA has held in the past and we only heard about it 3 weeks prior to the event. Because of this, students and instructors did not know what to really expect at the event.
This year’s competition hosted 33 of Indiana’s best high school precision machining students, most of whom are from career centers, from around the state that have participated in this event for multiple years. Students were given the option to compete in one of two events, Manual Machining or CNC Programming. In the manual milling section, students were to complete 7 different common manual machine processes and take part in a standard test of their knowledge about manual machining.  In the CNC programming section, students are given a part print, tool list, and material and are challenged to manually write the CNC G&M code to make the final part.  Students have to make all the correct cutting speed and feed calculations and the correct coordinate pair points for the part. CNC participants also take part in a standard test of their knowledge of CNC Machining.
After 4 plus hours of practical machining, students are evaluated and scored.  The top 6 in each section get various scholarships to Vincennes University.  In addition, the top 3 place holders in each section are awarded precision machining tools as a prize.  The student with the highest score in each sector also gets a “Traveling Trophy” to hold at their school until the next competition the following year.
Our own Red Devil Machinist Joshua Rech placed first and earned the Highest Score in the CNC Programming section at the competition.  Lowell High School was awarded with the Traveling Trophy until next year. Josh was awarded with a $2000 scholarship, if he chooses, to attend Vincennes University.  He was also awarded over $2000 in precision machining tools that he is able to use for his future career. Due to Josh winning the championship, the Lowell High School Precision machining program was awarded $1000 to help with future costs of the program.

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J. Everett Light Career Center Shapes Workforce of the Future

J. Everett Light Career Center provides programs that allow local high school students an opportunity to explore their passion in an innovative, hands-on, real-world environment. Director & Principal Shawn Wright-Browner offers insight into how the initiative is playing a key role in developing Indiana’s workforce of the future. CLICK TO WATCH THE VIDEO

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Kim Rosenbaum and Twin Lakes High School (Monticello, Indiana) Win 2021 Harbor Freight Tools for Schools Prize for Teaching Excellence

Kim Rosenbaum, a welding teacher from Monticello, Indiana, has been named a winner of the 2021 Harbor Freight Tools for Schools Prize for Teaching Excellence, winning $15,000 for herself and $35,000 for her program.

Rosenbaum, who teaches at Twin Lakes High School, is one of 15 prize winners. Additionally, three grand prize winners together with their schools will receive $100,000 each.

“Through the welding program, the students have themselves discovered how to be teachers and to respect people of different educational levels, genders, and racial backgrounds,” said Rosenbaum. “They have learned to switch roles with authority figures and have increased their level of patience and confidence. They also experience pride in themselves for mastering a specialized skill and passing it on to others. These students have a unique opportunity to put themselves in others’ shoes, recognizing and respecting that we all have different strengths.”

The mission of Harbor Freight Tools for Schools is to increase understanding, support and investment in skilled trades education in U.S. public high schools.

“High school skilled trades teachers and their programs are an essential part of addressing the skilled trades worker shortage,’’ said Danny Corwin, executive director of Harbor Freight Tools for Schools. “These dedicated educators make a huge difference in the lives of young people every day, setting them on a course for a meaningful career and to make a difference in their community.’’

The Harbor Freight Tools for Schools Prize for Teaching Excellence was launched in 2017 by Eric Smidt, the founder of national tool retailer Harbor Freight Tools, to recognize outstanding instruction in the skilled trades in U.S. public high schools.

“Among the key things we came to appreciate during the pandemic is the value of hands-on learning and the incredible resilience and commitment of our teachers,’’ Smidt said. “We are grateful that these outstanding winners and thousands of educators like them across the country are developing tomorrow’s skilled workforce.’’

Research by NORC at the University of Chicago has found deep and bipartisan support for increased funding for high school skilled trades education. According to the study commissioned by Harbor Freight Tools for Schools, in 2019 more than 78 percent of Republicans, Independents and Democrats said school districts should make skilled trades funding a priority. Despite that enthusiastic support, high school skilled trades education in U.S. public high schools is woefully inadequate to meet the demands of a skilled workforce. Existing high school programs cannot even meet even half of the employer demand for skilled tradespeople over the next decade. 

Overall, there are winners from 14 states: Alabama, California, Colorado, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Montana, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Texas, Virginia, Wisconsin and West Virginia.

Grand prize winners will each receive $100,000, with $70,000 going to their public high school skilled trades program and $30,000 to the individual skilled trades teacher behind the winning program. The 15 additional prize winners will each be awarded $50,000, with $35,000 going to their public high school program and $15,000 to the teacher. Due to school, district or state policy regarding individual cash awards, the schools of two of the winners will receive the entire prize winnings.

The 2021 prize drew more than 700 applications from 49 states and included three rounds of judging, each by an independent panel of experts from industry, education, trades, philanthropy and civic leadership. The application process, which included responses to questions and a series of learning modules, was designed to solicit each teacher’s experience, insights and creative ideas about their approach to teaching and success in helping their students achieve excellence in the skilled trades.

In July, the field was narrowed to 61 finalists. The 43 finalists who were not named winners today will each receive a $1,000 gift card from Harbor Freight Tools.

About Harbor Freight Tools for Schools

Harbor Freight Tools for Schools is a program of The Smidt Foundation, established by Harbor Freight Tools owner and founder Eric Smidt, to advance excellent skilled trades education in public high schools across America. With a deep respect for the dignity of these fields and for the intelligence and creativity of people who work with their hands, Harbor Freight Tools for Schools aims to drive a greater understanding of and investment in skilled trades education, believing that access to quality skilled trades education gives high school students pathways to graduation, opportunity, good jobs and a workforce our country needs. Harbor Freight Tools is a major supporter of the Harbor Freight Tools for Schools program. For more information, visit: harborfreighttoolsforschools.org

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USIC Partners with Indiana’s Hinds Career Center to Train High School Students for Careers as Utility Locate Technicians

INDIANAPOLISAug. 10, 2021 /PRNewswire/ — USIC employs more than 11,000 professional locate technicians who perform over 80 million underground utility locates each year to protect infrastructure and communities throughout the U.S. and in Canada. Headquartered in Indianapolis, Indiana, USIC has partnered with the Hinds Career Center, which is located about 50 miles north in Elwood, Indiana and serves seven school districts, to offer underground utility locating training to high school seniors.

Click HERE to read more

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Preparing for College and Careers (PCC) Teachers and Counselors – Porter County CTE Workshop

Friday, 30th April, 2021, Audra Peterson hosted the day-long workshop for Preparing for College and Careers (PCC) teachers and counselors in Valparaiso, Indiana with Matt Fleck from Inspire Success.The event included an industry panel, roundtable presentations by state and local experts, and sharing of tons of practical resources. Participants commented, “Great job!! Appreciate all of the great resources and info on changes from the state.”

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IU Health and Indianapolis Public Schools Present Inaugural Class of IU Health Fellows at Crispus Attucks High School

IU Health and Indianapolis Public Schools Present Inaugural Class of IU Health Fellows at Crispus Attucks High School Read More »

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